Wireless Grip Force Meter

Maximize the performance of your workholding! The most expensive lathe will not perform at its best if the chuck is not giving full grip force.

Description

Maximize the performance of your workholding! The most expensive lathe will not perform at its best if the chuck is not giving full grip force.

IMPROVE REPEATABILITY!

Maximize the performance of your workholding, and expensive lathes, by ensuring proper chuck function. The most expensive lathe will not perform at its best if the chuck is not giving full grip force.

  • Kitagawa-NorthTech wireless grip force meter is designed to quickly and accurately measure holding force and chuck speed.
  • Used for static or dynamic testing.
  • Sensor models are available in two sizes: 72 mm and 125 mm.
  • Can be configured for 2, 3, or 4 jaw operation by installing rest pads in the appropriate locations.
  • To measure large diameter chucks, extension rings and specialty jaw rest pads are available.
  • Uses standard 9v battery. Rechargeables are ok.

WIRELESS GRIP FORCE METER COMES IN A COMPLETE KIT!

  • Kit includes sensor, standard rest pads, RPM magnetic wand, display and padded carrying case.

VIEW A DEMONSTRATION ON HOW TO USE THE GRIP FORCE METER:

The graph below illustrates a sample grip force analysis conducted by Kitagawa-NorthTech on a 3 jaw power chuck.

 

HOW TO READ GRIP FORCE RESULTS

Scenario:  While checking your grip force, the reader indicates 3,000 lb of force

Question:  What does this mean?

 Answer:    All the forces are equal, meaning each jaw is pressing with 3000 lb-f. If you actually add up the force vectors the total is zero (if it wasn’t, something would be moving).

An analogy to help clarify:   Say I’m standing on my bathroom scale and it reads 200 lb, meaning I’m pushing down with 200 lb-f. The floor is also pushing up against me with 200 lb-f. That doesn’t mean that there are 400 lb of force — just 2x 200 lb-f in opposite directions.

The same applies to chuck force, except in this case there are 3 “sources” of force — the 3 jaws. Each one is pushing with 3000 lb-f.

TRY THIS OUT! This site explains the whole thing a bit more in-depth. The questions at the end are fun to work though, give them a try!:  Physics Classroom

 Example from Physics Classroom:

1. The following picture is hanging on a wall. Use trigonometric functions to determine the weight of the picture.

(see answer here)

USEFUL CONVERSION FACTORS

  • 1 kN = 1,000 Newton (N)
  • 1 N = 0.225 pound-force (lbf)
  • 1 lbf = 4.448 Newton (N)
  • 1 N = 0.102 kilogram-force (kgf)
  • 1 N = 0.102 kilopond (kp)

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